THE TRANSISTORMUSEUM™

MUSEUM STORE

 

HISTORIC TRANSISTOR HOBBYIST SUPPLIES!  

 

Authentic Supplies for the Transistor Historian and Kit Builder.

 

Available Only from the TransistorMuseum

 

All Transistors Tested

Before Shipment.

 

 

Historical Background

Originally known as the “double-base diode”, the unijunction transistor was invented at the General Electric Electronics Lab in Syracuse in the early 1950s.  This unique, single “pn” junction device became a very big seller for GE in the late 1950s and into the 1960s. The first high volume commercial unijunction product line was labeled as 2N489 – 2N494, with each of these different types selected for specific switching characteristics.  Motorola and TI were second source suppliers for unijunction transistors, with improved devices available even today using a variety of model numbers.

 

The unijunction transistor exhibits a performance characteristic known as negative resistance, which contributes to the usefulness of this device in switching and timing circuits that require a minimum number of additional components.  

 

 

 

 

              

Your 2N489 – 2N494 Transistor Order Will be Supplied in the Storage/Display Envelope Shown Above, which Includes an Insert with Historical Description

and a Schematic.

 

 

2N489 – 2N494

VINTAGE UNIJUNCTION TRANSISTORS

 
N-Type Silicon Bar
Unijunction Transistors

Vintage 1950s –1960s

Use: Timing/Waveforms

 

 

Your TransistorMuseum™

 2N489-2N494

 Order Will Contain:

 

One Tested Unijunction Transistor

 (Style Shown Above)

 

Hobbyist Insert Depicting the Historical Importance of this Unique Semiconductor Device, Includes a Schematic Using the Vintage Unijunction in a Relaxation Oscillator -  LED Flashing Circuit.

 

A TransistorMuseum™ Classic

Semiconductor Storage

 and Display Envelope 

 

 

 

 

ORDER NOW

 

$10 per Package (One Transistor)

Includes Shipping Within U.S.

 

Email me at

transistormuseum@aol.com

To Determine Payments Options

(Paypal or Check)

 

 

 

 

COPYRIGHT © 2005

By Jack Ward

All Rights Reserved.

 

  http://www.transistormuseum.com